A majority of consumers prefer brick-and-mortar stored when shopping.

If you think about the way most people shop, you may believe that consumers are more likely to pull out a computer and shop online than get in the car and head to the local mall. This is an easy opinion to have, but according to a new study, the opposite may be true.

Recently, A.T. Kearney released the results of its Omnichannel Shopping Preferences Study. The firm surveyed 2,500 consumers across all demographics.

According to Mike Moriarty, a partner in the retail practice of A.T. Kearney, and co-author of the study, one of the most interesting finds from the study comes from where customers prefer to shop. The results show that 90 percent of respondents would rather go to a physical store to make a purchase than shop online and that feeling was universal across all demographic and age groups.

“Everybody says that teens are online all the time and they do everything online,” Moriarty said. “What the survey found was that teens actually behave a lot like seniors. They actually do a lot more testing and trial in store, a lot more shopping in store, and do a lot of discovery online — much like seniors do.”

This finding backs up information that was found in a study from eMarketer where it was reported that 94 percent of total retail sales are still generated by brick-and-mortar stores.

Despite some headlines, physical stores are far from being dead. Companies should upgrade their point of sales systems to make sure they are capturing every potential transaction that comes through the door.