The eBay breach has caused consumers to distrust e-commerce.

The Target security breach was a major black eye for the retail world when it comes to brick-and-mortar shopping. Now, a breach of online retailerĀ and auction website eBay, that was disclosed at the end of May could do the same for e-commerce.

According to a release from the company, hackers were able to gain access to the website through the use of credentials from several employees. Once inside they were able to make their way to the customer database and access personal information for all 145 million users worldwide, all of which have been urged to change their account information.

While the damage to consumers is still being investigated, the blow that this creates for the e-commerce platform is already being felt.

A recent survey from USA Today found that 24 percent of respondents said they have stopped buying products online in recent weeks because of increased concerns over the digital information safety. On top of that, 56 percent said they have cut down on the number of websites they visit and were only going to the more well-known organizations that they feel can keep their information safe.

“It’s pretty amazing to me that people were willing to pull the plug on their habits,” Cameron Camp, a security expert with ESET, a San Diego-based security and antivirus company, told the news source.

Protecting your POS equipment is clearly something that every organization needs to get better at. These two breaches have dramatically changed how many consumer shop. From protecting the point of sale and inventory system to making sure networks are secure, this challenge continues to grow.